Meet the Graduating Class of 1776

The year was 1776 and the American colonists were too busy fighting a war against the imperialist nation of England to be going to college. There was no American History gen-ed at the time—they had to make it first. 

In order to gain independence the leaders of America had to do three very important things: stand up against a dominate nation and declare their right to be governed by a local authority of their choosing as appose to a hasty, omnipotent King; coordinate and fight a war against said military powerhouse; and then unite 13 states with different legal interests and goals under one complex democratic foundation. 

The founding fathers needed more than just courage to pull this off. They needed some smarts. Had it not been for the intellectual training of these men it’s possible that this whole red, white and blue thing may have never come together. In honor of that, we’re going to take a look at what colleges these men went to: 

Alexander Hamilton

School: King’s College (now Columbia University)

Education: Being an orphan, Alexander Hamilton's education was paid for by local wealthy men. He studied economics and finance which enabled him to construct a financial system for 2.5 million colonists who had just become Americans. 

James Madison 

School: The College of New Jersey (now called Princeton University) 

Education: Among many things, Madison studied law, public policy, speech and debate. He used these skills to theorize and construct much of the constitution including the decisively 'America' Bill of Rights. 

John Adams 

School: Harvard College 

Education: Starting at 16 John Adams got a bachelors of arts, which in those days meant a whole lot of reading and writing—both in Latin and English. It was these soft communication skills that made him a phenomenal diplomat. His legacy is bringing together a divided nation of colonists to fight a war, win a war, and stay together after winning the war. 

Benjamin Franklin 

School: No college, just public school. One of America’s first public schools: Boston Latin School. 

Education: He didn’t even graduate, he was a voracious reader and extremely active politician, inventor, scientist and civic activist. If he were alive today, he'd probably be a high school drop out inventing apps in Silicon Valley. 

Thomas Jefferson 

School: the College of William & Mary 

Education: Jefferson studied everything from metaphysics to law, and was sucked into the writings of John Locke, Francis Bacon and Isaac Newton. Those writing influences came in handy when he wrote his own masterpiece—the Declaration of Independence. 

John Hancock 

School: Boston Latin School and Harvard College 

Education: An education in law combined with an 18th century style internship turned job with with his Uncle’s mercantile business awarded Hancock the savvy (and funds) to serve as an influential political figure before and after independence was won. 

George Washington 

School: None. I’m talking elementary school level. 

Education: Climbed the military ranks and eventually (as we all know) became President. 

 

An education helps us solve problems, which is exactly what these men were doing. 

As much as we like to think so, the ideas that make America great weren’t created out of thin air—they were a progression of concepts covered through dedicated study. While there (hopefully) won’t be another revolution, our society is constantly being refined, and as the world grows it’s up to use our education to work together to pursue change and perfect the world we see.

College Advice College Life

There are countless distractions and obstacles during Finals week--luckily these apps just might help you overcome them!

Social media, roommates, dorm events and even you can be your worst enemy during finals week. 

These apps compiled by edtech digest are here to provide some focus and help you block out those pesky distractions when you might not always have the strongest will power.

Whether you study first thing in the morning, or late at night, both are great times to get the job done.  

There is so much research surrounding how we learn and study, from what music heightens brainpower to what foods could help you to more quickly recite a physics formula. Remember that despite all the research out there, it's most important to figure out what works for you personally.

A long road trip with friends sound like just the thing you need? Don’t forget to download these apps before you start your journey!

We are past the era of folded maps and highlighted routes. GPS and smartphones have made them obsolete. The Spectrum has put together a list of apps that could continue to make your road trip as safe, efficient, and fun as possible.

When finals are around the corner, it is important to remember the simple items that can get you through.

Finals week is crazy. It is a known fact. Students are hopped-up on coffee, screaming, crying, and everything in between. In order to try and keep your sanity, here are the five things USAToday claims are essentials you should not over look during finals.

The official countdown until the end of the semester has begun and the holiday season is on the horizon.

 

Balancing the need for December cheer and the dread of finals can be truly overwhelming.  You need a game plan that keeps your countdown to the merriest holidays, as well as your final semester GPA, intact. Here are a few things to keep you feeling warm and fuzzy while stressing about the end of the semester.

Making your holiday gift list? Don't forget to add these tech items for college.

Let's face it, technology is a big part of what we do every day. It's no wonder that we are using it more and more as part of the way we get and consume information. While college might not be exclusively digital just yet, chances are all your gadgets will be put through the ringer helping you get the grade.

Here's our list of the Top 5 Gadgets you'll need in college.

With everyone talking about how much it costs to go to college these days it's hard to imagine that any university could be considered rich.

But last week Harvard launched a $6.5 billion capital campaign (yes, BILLION with a "B"). The campaign, if successful, would become the largest ever by a higher education institution if they reach their goal by 2018. 

When you find yourself with too much free time and could use a little more cash in your pocket (who doesn’t) a part-time job might be a good idea.

Do you find yourself dreading every class you have…every semester? There is a way out!

There are so many people caught up in a major that they don't even enjoy. You're spending all that time in class and enormous amounts of money to take those classes – it’s important that you do something that makes you happy.

HerCampus has put together some of the tell tale signs that you are pursuing the wrong major. 

Heading home for a much needed break from school? Don't forget to pack these essentials!

Whether it be Thanksgiving break, winter break,spring break - any break from college classes can be a moment to catch your breath and relax.

Consider a not-so-typical college experience. 

When you try to imagine what it will be like going to college, you probably picture an academic year structured into two semesters (Fall and Spring) filled with a number of different classes that you take on different days of the week (typically Monday/Wednesday/Friday or Tuesday/Thursday). Toss in a couple of short breaks or so (Thanksgiving, Winter, and Spring) and about two and half months off for the summer, and you’ve pretty much got the standard academic year.

Those two words that strike fear is countless upon countless individuals…

Public speaking.

Yes, we mean standing up in front of any size crowd and just talking – may it be something about yourself or about a particular subject matter

Glossophobia (fear of public speaking) plagues about 74% of the US population.

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